Monday, December 31, 2012

Bathroom Limestone - Part 3 of 3 - Limestone Tiled and Finishing the Job

Fig.1 Limestone
By Gary Boutin 

Supplies and Tools:
Heavy leather gloves
Measuring tape
Notched trowel
Grout 1-lb
Grout float plastic
Grout sealer
Spacers
Sponge
Silicone
Thin-set mortar (for floor tile)
Tile (Limestone) meshed 12 by 12
Tile saw electric
Towels clean 
Utility knife

This job is located in the City of Pomona, a multilevel condominium in a beautiful rural setting with mature oak trees and a well established community. This job was accomplished with the help of my friend Carl.

This post shows the eight steps on how to install 12 inch by 12 inch limestone meshed tile.

Step 1: Above fig.1 shows the tiler must wear heavy leather gloves, limestone tile is very pretty but the edges are very sharp until the tile has been grouted. If you do not like having cuts on your hands or knees then wear gloves and knee pads.

Step 2: Fig.2 shows the job, measured the entire room and find out the dimension of the room. During the measurement we found the back wall was not squared.
Fig.2 Measure the room
Step 3: Fig.3 shows the starting point was the left corner of the bathroom. The back wall was not squared but eventually furniture would cover most of that wall. The entire bathroom is now completely tiled and ready for grouting.
Fig.3 Thin-set and 
new limestone tile
Step 4: Fig.4 shows the room covered with tile. The next day we prepared the floor to apply white sanded grout. Applied grout using a grout float.
Fig.4 Grouted Limestone
Step 5: Fig.5 shows the thin-set mortar on the backerboard, using a notched trowel. I allowed myself an area of two tiles at a time, when I had enough space ahead. Carl handed me the next tiles to lay on the floor. Then, I started placing the tile over the thin-set and aligning them using spacers between each tile. 
Fig.5 New Toilet
Step 6: Fig.6 shows that the toilet is caulked at the floor level around the base.
Fig.6 Caulking around toilet
Step 7: Fig.7 shows shows the handyman tuning the toilet for next use.
Fig.7 Placing bowl top
 Step 8: Fig.8 shows the bathroom is finished.
Fig.8 Job finished
Bathroom Limestone Tiling:

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    How to Replaced Bathroom toilet Bowl Lever

    Channel Lock® Pliers
    By Gary Boutin

    Supplies and Tools:
    Channel Lock ® pliers
    Toilet lever kit

    Jim Applehumber called about his toilet that was not working. He has a duplex in the Santa Clarita Valley, California. Jim said he jiggle the handle and the toilet just would not stop. When my week freed up I drove up to his home. The toilet had no water in it and Jim had turned off the toilet stop valve because he could not figure out what was wrong.

    This post shows seven steps on how to replace the toilet lever handle.

    Step 1: Fig.1 shows that the lever was not parallel with the toilet bowl. The lever has broken off and is in the middle of the bowl and is separated from the handle on the toilet.
    Step 2: Fig.2 and above top right shows a Channel Lock® Pliers removing the lever screw. Its counterclockwise on a toilet to prevent the nut from being screwed off.
    Fig.1 Inside toilet bowl
    Fig.2 Removing the lever
    Step 3: Fig.3 shows the parts to the new toilet lever.
    Step 4: Fig.4 shows a Channel Lock® Pliers removing the lever screw. Its counterclockwise on a toilet to prevent the nut from being screwed off.
    Fig.3 lever parts
    Fig.4 Installing new lever
    Step 5: Fig.5 shows the completed lever job. 
    Step 6: Fig.6 shows the last step is to hook up the flapper chain to the lever.
    Fig.5 Lever installed
    Fig.6 Add flapper chain
    Step 7: Fig.7 shows that the tank bowl cover is replaced and the job is finished.
    Fig.7 Toilet bowl fixed


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    Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

    How to Paint and Repair Alley Window

    Electric Drill
    By Gary Boutin

    Supplies and Tools:
    Electric circular saw 
    Electric drill and bits
    Flat head screwdriver
    Framing hammer
    Liquid nails adhesive
    Metal 16 gauge nails
    Measuring tape
    Oil base primer
    Oil base brown paint
    Paint Brush 4-inch
    Fat Measuring Tape
    Plywood Oriented Strand Board (OSB) 3/4 inch 
    Silver metal paint 
    Sheet rock screws
    White silicone

    Willie had a window in the rear of his cottage that overlooked an alley. He worried about his family safety, nothing had happened but graffiti had just been painted on his window screen. The window was not in use and the window had been replaced with hardboard not near enough security for my friend. He wanted the window and screen frame to be more secured.

    This post shows thirteen steps to secure this window.

    Step 1: Fig.1 shows a wooden frame with a metal screen.  
    Step 2: Fig.2 shows the window looks like from the alley. It has painted over with white graffiti.
    Step 3: Fig.3 shows a flat head screwdriver to remove the screen from the window.
    Fig.1 Wooden frame
    Fig.2 Window
    Fig.3 Pry off screen
    Step 4: Fig.4 and fig.5 shows removing the dirt with a 4-inch paint brush and dusted all over the window area. The plywood chosen was a 1-3/4-inch Oriented Strand Board (OSB) was used as sub-flooring. The plywood was measured and cut with an electric circular saw.
    Step 5: Fig.6 shows the back sides were painted on both sides of the OSB plywood with oil base primer to seal the plywood board.
    Fig.4 Paint frame
    Fig.5 Dust main window
    Fig.6 Oil primer
    Step 6: Fig.7 shows Liquid Nails adhesive was applied to the back side of the plywood and inserted the board within the window frame. Sheet rock screws to add additional security to the plywood board.
    Step 7: Fig.8 shows painted the front side of the board with the same paint as the back.
    Step 8: Fig.9 shows a painted the white plywood window board with two coats of oil Base brown paint.
    Fig.7 Liquid nails
    Fig.8 Oil primed
    Fig.9 Brown paint
    Step 9: Fig.10 and fig.11 shows applied white silicone to fill the wooden gaps in the wooden frame and painted the metal screen with silver metal paint, to remove the red painted graffiti.
    Step 10: Fig.12 shows prepared each side of the screen by using an electric drill with a bit to created several pilot holes for 16 gauge 4-inch nails on both sides of the screen. The screen is not for protection, it's for camouflage.
    Fig.10 Silicone
    Fig.11 Edge
    Fig.12 Nailed
    Step 11: Fig.13 shows the nails that were used to secure the screen to the wood edges.
    Step 12: Fig.14 shows painted the screen frame edges brown to match the window. Use the nails as handles and pushed the window screen into place and hammered the nails into place.
    Step 13: Fig.15 shows the window frame and the window screen finished.
    Fig.13 Nail both edges
    Fig.14 Oil painted
    Fig.15 Finished



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    Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

    How to Paint Damaged Baseboards


    Fig.1 Kilz® 
    white primer
    By Gary Boutin

    Supplies and Tools:
    Kilz® white primer
    Frazee ® White Paint
    Paint brush 1 inch
    Masking tape, 3 inches 

    Mrs. Hew called me because she was having a huge family party. Mrs. Hew noticed that she had damages from her dogs and she wanted her baseboards painted and some minor wall damage repaired.

    This post shows how damaged baseboards can be repaired and repainted.

    Step 1: Fig.1 shows the baseboards were painted with Kilz® latex primer.
    Step 2: Fig.2 shows the customer's to paint the damaged baseboards. 
    Fig.2 Frazee ® White Paint
    Step 3: Fig.3 shows the damaged baseboards.
    Fig.3 Damaged baseboards
    Step 4: Fig.4 shows the baseboards are dirty.
    Step 5: Fig.5 shows the baseboards have been washed with soapy water and wiped dry.
    Fig.4 Dirty baseboards
    Fig.5 Wipe baseboards
    Step 6: Fig.6 shows all the baseboards have masking tape on the floor. The tape protects the floor and give a nice painted line at the floor level. 
    Step 7: Fig.7 shows the painting brush applying paint on the top of the baseboards.
    Fig.6 Paint baseboards
    Fig.7 Pain top of baseboards
    Step 8: Fig.8 shows the baseboards have been painted with semi-gloss paint.
    Step 9: Fig.9 shows the job is finished and the baseboards are ready to be inspected.
    Fig.8 Semi-gloss paint
    Fig.9 Finished
    Step 10: Fig.10 shows the finished front foyer baseboards area. 
    Fig.10 Finished baseboards
    Fig.11 Drying
    Step 11: Fig.11 shows the garage area is all cleaned up.
    Step 12: Fig.12 shows the area has been vacuumed for painting debris. Now Mrs Hew is already for her party and she can plan for other activities.
    Fig.12 Vacuuming



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    How to Replace Patio Bedroom Screen

    Fig.1 Bent Screen Door
    By Gary Boutin

    Supplies and Tools:
    Aluminum screen 36-inch by 80-inches
    Cordless screwdriver 
    Flat heat screwdriver tip
    Silicone spray

    Joe Le-Rock called because his rental had a damaged patio door. He only knew that the renters left him several messages and that the work needed to be done. The home is located in downtown Corona.

    This post shows the seven steps to installing a warehouse patio door.

    Step1: Above fig.1 shows the patio door frame was bent, and not repairable.  
    Step 2: Fig.2 shows the old screen plus the old rubber spline to be tossed into the trash can.
    Fig.2 Old screen
    Step 3: Fig.3 shows the original bottom aluminum frame which is dirty and needed to be sprayed with silicone spray which will allow the wheels to roll easier.
    Fig.3 Dirty tracks
    Step 4: Fig.4 shows we cleaned the screen door tract with silicone spray to remove the dirt, sand and other particles.We removed the screen from its cardboard protector and plastic sheet. We added the top and bottom track layer.
    Fig.4 Safety pin
    Step 5: Fig.5 and fig.6 shows the new door on the clean tract and we adjusted the bottom tract to the door height.  
    Step 6: We the adjusted the screen door striker plate.
    Fig.5 Adjustable plate
    Fig.6 Latch
    Step 7: Fig.7 shows the door is ready to use and both the owner and the renter are satisfied.
    Fig.7 New door


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