Friday, April 20, 2012

Blue Bedroom - Part 2 of 7 - Acoustic Ceiling Removal

By Gary Boutin
Joint compound knives


Supplies and Tools:
Bug spray hand pump - portable
Broom with dustpan
Coveralls disposable Clear plastic  
Duct tape
Gloves disposable
Joint knives 3-inches (scraper) 
Ladder 6 feet or kitchen ladder
Plastic bag - cover shoes
Tarp (the size of the room)
Vacuum
Warm water

Tyler Zowat 's home is in Perris, California. He drive a commercial truck all week long, and to get ahead he even does odd job most weekends.Tyler wanted his little girl to have a grown up room and one thing he really wanted was to have the acoustic ceiling (popcorn) removed from her room. Tyler's home was built in the late 1990 and popcorn was used to hide ceiling flaws.

This post shows the fifteen steps on how to remove acoustic ceiling texture.
  • What is Asbestos? Asbestos is a mineral fiber.  
  • Asbestos can cause lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis.  
  • Residential homes built between 1930 and 1950 may have asbestos as insulation.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency states not dust, sweep, or vacuum debris that may contain asbestos.
  • One rule of thumb is if your residential home is built before 1980 then pay for the asbestos test. More questions?  Check this web site: www.epa.gov/asbestos/pubs/ashome
  • The most important STEP is to TEST the acoustic ceiling to make sure there is no asbestos. If the test shows that the ceiling has ASBESTOS then a contractor needs to remove the ceiling acoustic. 
  • www.asbestos-abatement.com/state-resources/california
Step 1: Put a hat on your head, shower cap, something to keep the mud that is being scrapped of your head.
Step 2: Purchase coveralls, some paint stores sell disposable so after the job just toss them into the trash. 
Step 3: Get some gloves, kitchen plastic gloves are great, just make sure they are not too tight.
Step 4: Do the same for your feet, shoe cover your shoes, or cover them in a plastic bag.
Step 5: Safety glasses to protect your eyes.
Step 6: Tarp the entire room, including taping the edges of the tarp with duct tape and remove all the furniture.
Step 7: If the furniture can not be removed, the furniture must be taped with clear plastic
to protect it from the mud that will fall from the ceiling.
Step 8: A powerful vacuum cleaner
attached with a floor hose.
Step 9: Fig.1 shows a portable bug sprayer with warm water.
Fig.1 Gray tarp
water bug sprayer
Step 10: Fig.2 shows the ceiling with acoustic ceilings, textured ceilings also known as popcorn.
Fig.2 Ceiling popcorn to be removed
Step 11: Fig.3 shows an industrial vacuum cleaner.
Fig.3 Vacuum removes popcorn dust
Step 12: Fig.4 shows dark portion on the ceiling has been sprayed with warm water.
Fig.4 Let water soak
Step 12: Fig.5 shows a water spray is sprayed on the ceiling.
Fig.5 Spray water spray
Step 13: Fig.6 shows a drywall knife pushing the wet popcorn off the ceiling.
Fig.6 Peel popcorn
Step 14: Fig.7 shows the mess from this job.
Fig.7 Popcorn on tarp
Step 15: Fig.8 shows the ceiling with no acoustic ceiling texture.
Fig.8 Ceiling finished
Now the ceiling needs to be sanded and there will be joint knife damage needs to be repaired. There is a plus to this job the person who does the removing has a great upper body workout, this job is done. 


Blue Bedroom:



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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

Blue Bedroom - Part 4 of 7 - Ceiling Painting

Fig.1 Behr® ceiling paint
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
Behr® ceiling paint white 1-gallons
Ceiling paint
Extension pole
Masking tape 2-inch
Metal paint tray with plastic inserts
Roller cover 3/8 inch nap
Roller frame 9 inch
Paint brush 1-inch
Extension pole 4 feet

Vinyl tarp
Work bench
Tarp

Tyler Zowat needed his little girl's room repaired. This post shows how the ceiling was painted with ceiling paint. 

This post shows the nine steps to paint a ceiling.
Step 1: Fig.1 shows the Behr® ceiling paint white 1-gallons on top of a painter' ladder. Ceiling paint was formulated to hide blemishes on the ceiling. This job required a 9-inch paint frame with a 3/8 inch nap roller cover. Placed over the floor a vinyl tarp and taped the tarp with a two inch masking tape at the edges of the tarp.
Step 2: Fig.2 shows an extension pole and screwed into the paint frame. Including metal paint tray with plastic inserts, roller cover and a paint brush used in this job.
Fig.2 Tools

Step 3: Moved the roller up and down as needed to get paint onto the roller cover. This step is repeated over and over until the ceiling is painted.
Step 4: Now roll the edges first and do the complete perimeter of the room.
Step 5: Roll the second coat in the opposite direction.
Step 6: Now the second coat is rolled on the twelve foot side and all that needs to be done is to paint the wall side edges.
Step 7: Use a 1-inch paint brush to apply the paint onto the ceiling edges, the goal is to get the edges so the paint roller not to hit the wall. Once that is done all that is needed is to have he paint dry.
Step 8: Fig.3 shows this type of paint dries in two hour to the touch but will take at least twenty-four hours to dry completely. 
Fig.3 Ceiling dries

Step 9: Fig.4 shows that one coat of paint will not provide durability and spots missed when rolling. Two coat of paint will look better and last twice as long. One-coat last just 3-years, while two coats can last up to 10-years. Upper body strength will make this job easier, otherwise at the end of the day, your muscles will definitely let you know you have work a good day.
Fig.4 Ceiling Dried
Blue Bedroom:


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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

How to Repair Wall Damage from a Metal Bed Frame

Fig.1 Crescent wrench
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:

Crescent wrench 
Cordless driver
Phillips tip 
Gypsum mud 
Sheetrock 

Mark's home was located in Ontario, California. He purchased a 4 poster bed frame. This frame had a metal extension for the headboard that wasn't used which extended 4 inches past the mattress set. It was there to hold a vertical post which was not used in this room. This extension created severe damage to the wall behind the bed.

This post shows the three steps to repairing the damaged wall by the bed.


Step 1: Removed the extension frame using a crescent wrench to stop any more wall damage. Fig.1 shows the hole created by the bed frame. This was a very large and heavy wooden bed not easily moved. Working on the bed was necessary to access the small wall space that needed repair.
Fig.1 Securing the wallboard back
Step 2: Fig.2 shows the new wallboard which was secured using a cordless driver with a Phillips bit. The sheetrock screws were placed into the top and bottom edges of the wallboard. 
Fig.2 Wallboard applied
Step 3: Fig.3 shows the wall was patched, sanded and primed.
Fig.3 Patch sanded and primed
Step 4: The last step was to apply wall texture, but Mark just wanted to have the patch primed and painted. Now Mark can enjoy his repaired bedroom.



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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-