Tuesday, February 21, 2012

How to Make Huge Dog Leather Bones Smaller

Fig.1 New leather bones
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
Aviator snips
Dog chew bones
Large bag of dog leather chews

I have two small dogs, and when I purchased those leather chew bones they came in 3 sizes. The smallest bag is the most expensive and the largest bag is the least. 

This post shows the two steps on how to solve this problem. 

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the largest bag of leather chews, large leather chew bones and aviator snips placed on a table. 
Step 2: Fig.2 shows the use of strong industrial scissors to cut the leather into smaller pieces. Now my two dogs can chew and eat these treat without getting sick on to much leather in their stomachs.
Fig.2 Leather to smaller pieces



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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

Monday, February 20, 2012

Blue Bedroom - Part 6 of 7 - Painting the Walls Blue

Fig.5 Wall cutter loaded with paint
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
Masking tape 2-inch
Metal paint tray with plastic inserts
Paint brush 2 inch
Pole sander
Roller cover 3/8 inch nap

Roller frame 9 inch
Sandpaper
Tarps 9x12

Tyler Zowat, noticed the listing and called me to come to his home in Perris, California. He had a little girl's room with blue walls and since his daughter had grown up and moved to private school, he wanted the bedroom closet finished. This post is a continuation of the previous post to finish the painting the wall blue. 
 

This post shows the seven steps to use an impact driver.

Step 1: Fig.1 above show a large plastic tarp that was used over the bedroom carpeting. 
Fig.1 Plastic tarps
Step 2: Fig.2 shows that the doorways were taped with painter's tape.
Fig.2 Painter's tape around doorway
Step 3: Fig.3 painters tape was applied on all edges of the carpeting.

Fig.3 Painter's tape on carpeting

Step 4: Fig.4 and fig.5 shows the tools needed to cut the bedroom walls.  Both a paintbrush and a paint cutter will edge the walls.
Fig.4 Paint brush, wall cutter

Step 4: Fig.6 through fig.9 shows the cutting of the paint near doorways, electrical plugs, closets and near the ceiling. The cutting tool prevents the paint from touching the ceiling thus leaving the wall with a neat trim painted line.
Fig.6 Cut around the door
Fig.7 Cut around the receptacles
Fig.8 Cut above the closet
Fig.9 Cut near the ceiling
Step 5: Fig.10 through fig.13 shows the walls being painted.
Fig.10 Corner being painted
Fig.11 Corner painted blue
Fig.10 Wall painted by the bedroom closet
Fig.11 Walls painted by the bedroom windows

Blue Bedroom:



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Friday, February 10, 2012

How to Use Bissell® Rug Cleaner

Bissell®  
Rug 
Cleaner
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
Bissell® rug cleaner
Kitchen sink with a strainer
Toilet or large laundry sink 

How do you clean your living room rug?

This post show the 30-step by step instructions on how to use the Bissell® rug cleaner for their personal home

Thirty steps to a clean rug. 

Step 1: Start out by moving your furniture to another area if possible.
Step 2: Vacuum the carpet area that needs cleaning.
Step 3: Use the recommended amount of soap in the instruction otherwise you will void the guarantee for your machine.
Step 4: If you are not sure read the instruction on how to fill the soap dispenser.
Step 5: With your foot, press the handle release lever on the back of the machine and lay handle down toward you to access the tank fig.2.
Fig.2 Laying flat
Step 6: Fig.2a shows the removed the tank from the base of the machine by lifting the tank carry handle.
Fig.2a Water bucket
Step 7: Carry like a bucket to the sink Fig.3 and move the handle toward the back of the tank to unlatch the lid.
Fig.3 Bucket
Step 8: Now fill the middle water tank.
Step 9: Fig.4 hot water is being applied to the internal water tank named the bladder.
Fig.4 Water bladder
Step 10: Fig.5 and fig.6, in front of the machine is the detergent container that will need to be filled.
Fig.5 Flow wheel
Fig.6 Soap container
Step 11: When the rug cleaner is running, press the water flow lever, see fig.7 to allow the water and detergent to go onto the carpeting.
Fig.7 Carpeting
Step 12: The red spinner (plus sign) will spin which shows an ample water applied to the rug area.
Step 13: Notice the cap is attached for maintenance of the spinner area, once in a while hair or dirt particles will enter and need to be removed. 
Step 14: Now that the bladder is full, return the container to the machine area. 
Step 15: Close the lid and pull up the unit handle. 
Step 16: Fig.8 shows to turn on both switches on the back of the machine.
Fig.8 Both switches are on

Step 17: Push the Bissell® forward and back to clean the rug.
Step 18: Fig.9 shows the process is to drive the rug cleaner one way, then turn around and do another run, slightly over the other clean stroke and repeat until the tank runs dry.
Fig.9 Cleaning rug
Step 19: When the red spinner doesn't move that indicates the bladder tank is dry and the excess water in the tank needs to be dumped into a large sink.
Step 20: Next step is to remove the tank from the unit, bring it to a sink or toilet and remove the top and empty the tank slowly into the toilet or sink. 
Step 21: Fig.10 the dirty water, and in fig.11 the water is being drained into the toilet.
Fig.10 Dirty water
Fig.11 Into toilet
Step 22: Its larger than a sink and the toilet has a larger diameter drain than a sink.
Step 23: Once that is done, go back to the sink and clean out the top of the tank and the bladder by rinsing it in the sink.
Step 24: Place a screen in the sink so the carpet fibers and gunk will not go into your sink pipes.
Fig.12 Bladder tank
Step 25: The process of removing dirty water and filling the water bladder tank fig.12 many times until the carpet is cleaned.   
Step 26: Fig.13 and fig.14 show the progression of cleaning a carpet, notice the clean carpet lines.
Fig.13 Clean carpet
Fig.14 Living room
Step 27: After the carpet is clean, remove as much water as possible from the rug by ruing the rug cleaner.
Step 28: You can see the water being sucked out of the carpet and that will decrease the drying time if you can remove that water. It takes practice, but it's worth the additional trouble to get the job done correctly.
Step 29: Fig.15 and see that the unit parts are clean.
Fig.15 Clean water tank
Step 30: The last step is to clean the tank and unit off and put it away for next time, I have my unit in the front coat closet near my vacuum cleaner.  Enjoy your new clean carpet and now your home is all ready for spring parties.


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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

Saturday, February 4, 2012

How to Install a Decorative Towel Rack

Screw and drill bit
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
Cordless screwdriver with Phillips bit
Hammer
Nail
Pencil
Phillips pan head screws
Torpedo level
Wood level 2-ft

Mrs. Black loves bright and wild decorations specially if unique and useful. Her home was located in Ontario, California in a well developed area.

This post shows the five steps on how to install a simple kitchen towel rack. 

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the towel rack kit. The towel rack holes was marked with a pencil.
Fig.1 Rack kit
Step 2: Fig.2 shows the use of a nail to create a pilot hole into the cabinet.
Fig.2 Pilot holes

Step 3: Fig.3 shows once the mark was on the kitchen cabinet, a cordless screwdriver with Phillips® bit and placed the pan head screws into the cabinet wall.
Fig.3 Small drill
Step 4: Fig.4
shows the towel rack on the first screw, and with a torpedo level leveling the towel rack.
Fig.4 Level
Step 5: Fig.5
shows the pencil to mark the second hole and placed the second screw into the hole of the towel rack. 
Step 6:
Show the final towel rack in the kitchen cabinet.  Now she is ready to hang wild and interesting towels.
Fig.5 Finished


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Friday, February 3, 2012

Permanent Door Stop

Fig.1 Door stop
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
Caulking (manual) Gun
Liquid Nails® Adhesive

Tyler Zowat 's home was in Perris, California. He had a huge family that visited his large home regularly. I received a call from Tyler that his nieces had removed all the door stops in the house and he wanted a solution. Usually door stops are just screwed into a door or baseboard and are not permanent.

Step 1: Above fig.1 shows a door stop placed on a door instead of the wall.
Step 2: Fig.2 shows Liquid Nails® adhesive and applied the glue to all the door stop screws. Applied the adhesive for over 10-doors with this new technique and it worked fine. Tyler has not called for any other door stop repairs, the adhesive must have been strong enough to stop those little idle hands.
Fig.2 Permanent Door Stop



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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-