Saturday, July 22, 2017

How to Adjust and Tightened Backyard Metal Fence on a Wood Fence

Eight inch crescent wrench
Fig.1 Eight or six inch 
crescent wrench

By Gary Boutin 

Tools and Supplies:
Crescent Wrench
Closed/Open End Wrench 7/16
Level 4 - Foot
Ratchet and 7/16 Socket

This post shows the fifteen steps on the process to repair the back up switch for the fireplace.

Step 1: Fig.1 shows this crescent wrench is one way to tightened the lag bolts on the fence.
Step 2: Fig.2 shows this tool is an open and close end wrench. Use to closed end to get a good grip on the lag screw hex head.
Open End Wrench
Fig.2 Open and close 
end wrench
Step 3: Fig.3 shows there is a fastest way use a Ryobi Cordless Screwdriver (or any cordless drill) with a 7/16 nut driver. Or use a  1/4 in. x 1/2 in. Steel Square Socket Adapter with the magnetic bit tip shown to the left.
Ryobi 12-Volt Cordless Drill with Makita Bit Holder
Fig.3 Ryobi Cordless Screwdriver
Step 4: Fig.4 shows the left lag screws is loose from the fence. All the lag bolts that held up the metal driveway fence had become loose and some new lag screws were missing washers. Washers help distribute the lag bolt into the wood fence.
Od damaged bolt
Fig.4 Loose Lag Screws
Step 5: Fig.5 shows the top of a metal fence its hinge is not leveled any more.
Gate hinge
Fig.5 Top hinge 
of metal fence
Step 6: Fig.6 shows the bottom of a metal fence and its hinge is not leveled either which explain one of the reason why this fence was not closing.
Bottom Gate Hinge
Fig.6 Bottom hinge
Step 7: Fig.7 shows the hinge was loose and also tightened. This time all the lags were tightened firmly into the corner of the home.
Stucco Wall Gate Latch
Fig.7 Latch
Step 8: Fig.8 shows the latch is working correctly and its holding the gate pin.
Metal latch
Fig.8 Latch working
Step 9: Fig.9 shows the lag screws in the 4x4 wood post needed thin dowels inserted into the hole and the lag screw was placed inside the hole to tightened the fence to the post.
Metal gate is leveled
Fig.9 Metal gate
Step 10: Fig.10 shows the gate fence are leveled.

Front view gate leveled
Fig.10 Not binding on cement
Step 11: Final fence repair: Fig.11 and fig.12 show the fence is now level and ready to use.

Back side of galvanized post
Fig.11 Attached is secured
Job done gate is ready for use
Fig.12 Fence ready to use

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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

Sunday, July 16, 2017

How to Assemble On-Line Living Room Furniture

Fig.1 Box arrived unassembled
By Gary Boutin

Tools and Supplies:
Allen Wrench (provided)

We received a mail order living room furniture from Amazon.com. It was easy to assemble and I have enjoyed it ever since. The steps below show how the installation was accomplished. 

This post shows the nine steps on how to assemble living room side table.

Step 1: Fig.1 through fig.4 shows the unpacking of the living room side table. Fig.1 shows the box arrived from Amazon.com and ready to be assembled. Fig.2 shows a lined box that held the wood furniture. Fig.3 shows the carton box and Styrofoam that provided the protection for the living room side table. Fig.4 shows the side table being removed from the box.
Fig.2 Lined packing box
Fig.3 Wood protected 
with Styrofoam
Fig.4 Unpacking the box
Step 2: Fig.5 and fig.6 shows the furniture list and the hardware bag.

Fig.5 List each piece
Fig.6 Hardware
Step 3: Fig.7 through fig.10 shows the pieces being counted prior to assembly. Fig.7 shows the left side is intact and good shape. Fig.8 shows the bottom base of the table. Fig.9 shows the right side of the table leg. Fig.10 both sides of the table are fine and ready to assemble.
Fig.7 left side
Fig.8 Bottom page
Fig.9 Right side
Fig.10 Both sides together
Step 4: Fig.11 and fig.12 shows the plans to assemble the table.
Fig.11 Plans
Fig.12 Plans
Step 5: Fig.13 and fig.14 shows the table is upside down and the legs are attached to the drawer assembly. 
Fig.13 Top drawer assembly
Fig.14 One side attached
Step 6: Fig.15 and fig.16 shows the plans to finish the base to the rest of the table.
Fig.15 base plans
Fig.16 My spouse assembling unit
Step 7: Fig.17 through fig.19 shows the table being put together by my spouse Linda.
Fig.17 Assemble the bottom
Fig.18 Finished side view
Fig.19 Finished from view
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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

Monday, May 8, 2017

G.E. Stovetop Igniter Won't stop Sparking

By Gary Boutin
Fig.1 Metal grate


Part and Supplies:
BBQ flame torch
Cotton Swabs with Wood Handles (optional)
Isopropyl Alcohol - 1 Pint (optional)
Long stick matches
Nothing (Always an option)

After a day cooking, the stove top needed to be cleaned. While washing the stove top with a wet sponge the stove top igniter repeatedly was arching. The only choice was to turn off the igniter at the electrical panel because our electrical plug is behind the stove top. When the breaker was placed in the on position, the igniter would not turn off, the only choice was to turn off the electrical breaker until the solution was solved. 

This post shows the six steps to turn the stove top igniter back on without doing any work.

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the stove top metal grate that was removed for cleaning. 
Step 2: Fig.2 shows a burner cap assembly (round metal plate), that allows the gas flames in a circular patter. This must be removed to get to the igniter. 
Fig.2 Burner cap assembly
Step 3: Fig.3 shows the large surface burner that must be removed to expose the igniter.
Fig.3 Medium surface burner
Step 4: Fig.4 shows the white circular porcelain piece is the stove top igniter electrode.
Fig.4 Igniter electrode.
Step 5: Fig.5 shows the stove top with all the accessories removed, only the maintop is exposed for cleaning each electrodes. If a lot more cooking is required and time is a problem than clean each electrode using a cotton swab and very little isopropyl alcohol. Once cleaned and the water moisture removed, place all the parts on the stove. Turn on the each gas knob (knobs are on the right side of this picture) so the igniter will turn on the gas flame. 
Fig.5 Maintop assembly stainless steel
Step 6: Fig.6 shows the large stove top flame. For this stove top nothing was done. The stove igniter electrode was not turned off for one day to give the moisture a chance to dissipate. The electrical breaker was in the OFF position. Sometimes nothing needs to be done and the moisture took care of itself through the regular use of the stove top. When the electrical breaker was in the Off position the stove flames was lite using long stick matches or BBQ flame torch. After one day the kitchen electrical breaker was turned on and the igniter lite the gas flame so the stove top could be used. Non-repair finished.
Fig.6 Stove top flame


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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-