Saturday, October 22, 2016

Old Metal Shelf to New Paint Locker

Fig.1 Used 
Metal Locker
By Gary Boutin                     

Tools and Supplies:
Metal brush and Scraper
Spray Paint primer
Moving pad
Painting tarp

My service company was given a old used up paint locker. My last metal shelf locker was too small for all the paint cans and adhesive that was used in my business. This post shows that even a used up metal locker with the proper care can be used again.

This post shows the five steps to paint a rattan dining room table.
 
Step 1: Fig.1 shows the metal paint locker. Fig.2 and fig.3 shows the box has a rusted bottom.
Fig.2 Using tarps
on the car
Fig.3 Preparing 
for cleanup
Step 2: Fig.4 through fig.6 shows the use of the wire brush and scraper to remove most of the bad rust areas on the bottom of the cabinet. 
Fig.4 Wire scraper
Fig.5 Paint scraper
Fig.6 Paint scraper
Step 3: While the cabinet is on the car the bottom of the cabinet is primed. Fig.7 and fig.8 shows that the bottom of the cabinet is painted in white Kilz™  primer.
Fig.7 Prime the bottom
Fig.8 Bottom painted
Step 4: Fig.9 through fig.11 shows the cabinet has been removed from the car and a moving truck is used to  move the cabinet from the car to the garage area. Fig.12 shows the cabinet is being filled with paint supplies.
Fig.9 Placing 
cabinet on the 
moving truck
Fig.10 Trucking 
the cabinet
Fig.11 Clean,  
painted and 
ready to fill
Fig.12 
Paint supplies


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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

How to Assemble a Tile Table

Fig.1 Tile Table
By Gary Boutin                     

Tools and Supplies:
Cleaning brush 
Grinder
Lime Away™
Soap and water

Joe S. had purchase a tile table from a local charity. It was loaded with white calcium and dirt. He wanted this table to be on the patio. He needed help solving this problem. He called my repair service. 

This post shows the three steps to clean and assemble the tile table.

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the table now cleaned from the dirt and calcium. Fig.2 shows Lime Away™ was used to remove the calcium from the tile. A hard brush with soap removed the dirt from metal edges of the table. Fig.3 shows that the clean table tile ready to go back on the table.
Fig.2 Clean table edges
Fig.3 Cleaned tiles
Step 2: The assembly: Fig.4 through fig.7 show each tile of the table place one at a time on the metal table frame. Some grinding was used because some tile would not fit the metal table edges.
Fig.4 First tile
Fig.5 Second Tile
Fig.6 Third tile
Fig.7 Final  tile
Step 3: Fig.8 shows the finished table which is ready to use.
Fig.8 Table ready

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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

How to Assemble Banker's Office Files

Fig.1 Banker's Box Files
By Gary Boutin                     

Tools and Supplies:
Bankers Office Files
Scissors

Mrs. Day had papers and photos all over her office and walls. She categorized cat pictures for a feline magazine. She needed serious organization for her paper. Looking at the U-line catalog, we decided that purchasing Banker's Office boxes would work to file her business paper and feline pictures.

This post shows the seven steps to build a Banker's box from a cardboard kit.
 
Step 1: Fig.1 shows this is a card box banker's box. Fig.2 shows the box plans and the pieces that make up the banker's file. Fig.3 shows the only tool will be scissors to cut the plastic bands on the box. The rest is folding pieces of cardboard to make the Banker's file box. 
Fig.2 Banker's piece plans
Fig.3 Scissors
Step 2: Fig.4
show the plan diagram to fold the bottom of the office file box. Fig.5 shows the box flaps are folded. Fig.6 shows one edge will be folded into the other gap. Fig.7 and fig.8 shows the flaps have made a wall.
Fig.4 Diagram

Fig.5 Open the box
Fig.6 Fold the flaps
Fig.7 Outside wall
Fig.8 Inside wall
Step 3: Fig.9 shows the diagram and fig.10 shows that each tray was placed into the box. 
Fig.9 Diagram
Fig.10 Trays 
placed in box
Step 4: Fig.11 shows the diagram and fig.12 shows for the middle wall has been inserted. 

Fig.11 Diagram
Fig.12 Middle 
wall inserted
Step 5: Fig.13 shows the both side edges need to be folded inside. Fig.14 shows the blue side edges have been folded inside the box.
Fig.13 Diagram
Fig.14 Fold inside
Step 6: Fig.15 through fig.17 shows to fold the top and bottom edges inside the box.

Fig.15 Diagram
Fig.16 bottom flap
Fig.17 Fold inside

Step 7: Fig.18 and fig.19 shows the finished product. Fig.19 shows the finished product. Now this is one box Mrs. Day had a wall of files to keep her business under control.
Fig.18 Finished without files
Fig.19 Business files


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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

Monday, October 17, 2016

How to Install an Munchkin™ Auto-Close Metal Gate

This Munchkin™  Auto-Close Metal Gate was purchased at a pet warehouse store.
Fig.1 Munchkin™
Auto-Close Metal Gate
By Gary Boutin

Tools and Supplies: 
Auto Close Metal Gate By Munchkin™
Cordless Screwdriver with Phillip Bit
Measurement tape

A friend in our condominium complex wanted a new dog door installed in her kitchen. She purchased Auto Close Metal Gate By Munchkin™ at our local pet warehouse store. She wanted to keep her Miniature Schnauzer out of the dog food. Both of them had a realized how easy the door to the pantry was to open. All they had to do was press with their paws to open the door. Then they could eat all day while their master was doing errands.

This post shows the six steps for installed a Munchkin™ Auto Close Metal Gate.

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the Auto Close Metal Gate by Munchkin. This gate works very well to keep little children and very smart dogs out of the kitchen. Fig.2 shows the gate has a supply list and all the parts were in the box and easy to identify. Fig.3 shows the gate has many templates
These are the parts needed to install the Munchkin™ Auto-Close Metal Gate
Fig.2 The parts
This gate has several templates for the installation process.
Fig.3 Gate Templates
Step 2:  Templates: Fig.4 and fig.5 shows installation templates, that help in the installing of this gate.
This is a sample  of the templates that shows were to install the hinges
Fig.4 Templates
This is the template and the door hinge template
Fig.5 
Templates
Step 3: Fig.6 shows one of the preformed latch/hinge that will hold the gate in place. Fig.7 through fig.9 shows the pads with double stick tape on each closing pads for the latch side of the gate. This protects the kitchen wall.

This is a hinge that has been installed for the gate
Fig.6
This shows two latch pads for the gate
Fig.7 Wall pads
Each latch pad has tape that can be applied to the wall
Fig.8 Double tape
To remove the protective film peel it off the pad and apply it to the wall
Fig.9 Peel to apply to wall
Step 4: Installation: Fig.10 shows the location of the bottom latch, fig.11 shows the top latch and fig.12 shows how each hole was drilled for the metal screws.
This pad is installed on the bottom of the kitchen floor wall
Fig.10
To make sure the pad is secure press the pad against the wall
Fig.11
If a pilot hole is drilled then the wall will not get damaged.
Fig.12
Step 5: Fig.13 shows that the closing pad can be adjusted with a special wrench. Keep this wrench handy it help to keep the gate level. Fig.14 shows a level was used to make sure the gate was level. Fig.15 shows the hinge side of the gate is completely installed.
Use this special gate wrench to adjust the gate
Fig.13 Wrench adjustment
This gate is being leveled
Fig.14 Leveling gate
This gate hinge side is ready to be used.
Fig.15 Hinge side
Step 6: Fig.16 shows the game is fully installed and ready to be tested by Miniature Schnauzers. We went outside and tested the gate and the dogs were still in the hallway waiting patiently to get to the kitchen area. This job is finished. The installation time was less than thirty minutes.
This gate is finished and ready to be checked out by the dogs.
Fig.16 Completed gate

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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-