Monday, March 28, 2011

How to Paint Bathroom Wood Drawers

These drawers need to be painted
Fig.1 Drawer that 
need painting
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools: 
Brush 2-inch economy size
Large tarp 9 by 12-feet
Primer white 
Rags for paint drips
Small mini roller cover
Small paint frame
Paint tray
White satin gloss paint

This post shows the six steps on how to paint bathroom drawers.

Willey called my repair service for a small job. He wanted to refresh his bathroom drawers. They had been abused by a former renter and he wanted the drawers to be clean. Below are the steps used to get old drawers to look new again. 

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the first step is to gather the drawers on a 9 by 12 tarp which will confines the paint drips. 
Step 2: Fig.2
shows the use of a 2-inch economy brush and paint one coat of white primer to cover any stains.
Apply primer to the entire drawer, inside and outside
Fig.2 Primer

Step 3: Fig.3 and fig.4 shows use a small mini roller painting the sides of the drawer, in this case the right side needed to be painted, it is the side that would show when the drawer is opened. Clean the brush and use the same paint brush to paint the drawers with white satin gloss paint.
This roller cover slides over a metal paint frame
Fig.3: Small mini roller
Paint the inside and the drawer area of the bathroom cabinet
Fig.4 Rolling cabinet edges
Step 4: Fig.5 shows one repainted drawer on the tarp, the first drawer is ready to be placed into the bathroom vanity.  
Here is one one drawer completed
Fig.5 One repainted drawer

 Step 5: Fig.6 shows all the drawers are dry.
All the wooden bathroom drawers are painted and drying
Fig.6 Drawers Dry
  Step 6: Fig.7 shows all the drawers are placed inside the vanity and ready for use.
This is the bathroom cabinet drawers are finished and ready for use
Fig.7 All Bathroom 
Drawers painted

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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

Sunday, March 27, 2011

Paint Smell to Vanilla Smell

This is our spice area
Fig.1 The spice rack
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
12-volt Ryobi drill Cordless drill
Paint Mixing paddle
Nut driver with Phillip bit
Paint (interior and exterior)
Wood stirring sticks

Tyler Zowat 's home is in Perris, California. He drive a commercial truck all week long, and to get ahead he even does odd job most weekends. Tyler wanted his little girl to have a grown up room and one thing he really wanted was the paint to not have that paint smell. This post shows a quick and simple way to change the paint smell before painting a room.

This post shows the ten steps on how to apply vanilla extract to paint.

Step 1: Fig.1 shows the my home spice cabinet. Next, locate the vanilla extract. Click here to learn more. 
Step 2: Fig.2 through fig.5 shows different kinds of paint.

Good quality Kilz® primers paint
Fig.2 Kilz® 
primers paint

Behr® Premium Plus paint
Fig.3 Behr® 
Premium Plus paint
Semi-gloss® paint
Fig.4 Semi-gloss® 
 paint
Glidden® Interior Paint
Fig.5 Glidden® 
Interior Paint


Step 3: Fig.6 and fig.7 shows the tools needed to mix the paint. The 12-volt Cordless Ryobi® drill and a nut driver.
Electric drill or Ryobi® 12-volt Cordless drill is needed to mix the paint
Fig.6 Ryobi 12 volt 
cordless drill
Makita bit holder with hold the paint paddle
Fig.7 Nut driver 
with Phillip bit
Step 4: Fig.8 shows the purchase of a good quality McCormick® Vanilla Extract. This is your secret ingredient for improving the paint smell.

McCormick Vanilla Extract
Fig.8 Vanilla 
Extract

Step 5: Fig.9 shows that a one teaspoon measurement spoon is used to measure the vanilla extract into the paint.  

Tip:  
1 Teaspoon [US] = 4.92892159 Milliliters, 
1 Teaspoon [Metric, Australia] = 5 Milliliters and
1 Teaspoon [UK] = 5.91938802 Milliliters 


Step: 6 Fig.10 shows the spoon set used to measure the vanilla extract.

Blue plastic teaspoon
Fig.9 One teaspoon 
measurement

Step 6: Fig.10 shows the new bottle of vanilla extract and the measurement spoon ready to be applied to the paint.

Pour one teaspoon from the bottle into the measurement teaspoon
Fig.10 One teaspoon 
of Vanilla

Step 7: Fig.11 shows the vanilla extract product label. The label states: The ingredients: Vanilla Bean Extractives in water and alcohol (41%). 

Note: The reason why this works is one gallon of paint equals 128 ounces. One gallon of paint equals 768 teaspoons. The ratio is 1:768. This is the reason why the vanilla does not alter the color of the paint, the vanilla removes the paint smell. 
How the vanilla extract was made
Fig.11 How its made

Step 8: Fig.12 through fig.14 shows the mixing of the paint. Now is the time to add the vanilla extract to the paint. Next attach the paint paddle to the Ryobi drill (or any drill driver) and set the drill to the drill setting. Once that is done, place the paddle into the paint and start at the lowest setting. Otherwise the paint will splatter in a nice circle around the paint pail and get all over the floor. Next mix the paint thoroughly. 
Mix the paint prior to placing the vanilla extract
Fig.12 Mixing paint

Notice the paint paddle is not going fast
Fig.13 Top view
This is a side view of the paint being stirred by the paint paddle
Fig.14 Side view

Step 9: Fig.15 and fig.16 can be done with a stirring stick too.
The paint can be stired manual using a Home Depot free wood paint stick
Fig.15 Stir the paint

Place the vanilla and stir it into the paint
Fig.16 Ready to pain.

Step 10: Fig.17 now just roll the paint and apply it to the walls
Paint can, Paint tray and roller ready to paint the walls
Fig.17 the paint is ready


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Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

How to connect a Stove's Power Cord

This is an electrical screwdriver it has a rubber handle and a flat tip
Fig.1 Electrical 
Screwdriver
By Gary Boutin

Supplies and Tools:
Electrical Screwdriver
Electrical flat tipped screwdriver 

In this job, the stove was pulled out because the tiler wanted to tile under the stove area and some wires became loose, thus the stove would not work. My job was to find the problem and solve it.   
      Step 1: Fig.1 above shows the and electrical screwdriver depending on the make of the stove, the plate screw could either be a flat head metal screw or a Phillip screw .
      Step 2: Fig.2 shows the electrical plug laying over the stove top. Next if connected removed the electrical plug from the wall. Turn off the electrical breaker.
      Stove 120 volt electrical plug
      Fig.2 Remove plug
      Step 3: Fig.3 shows that the new stove must be pulled back to get to the electrical panel is in plain sight.
      The power panel area is covered by a metal protective plate
      Fig.3 Back of stove
      Step 4: Fig.4 shows that to get to the electrical sheet metal panel the protective plate must be removed to place the electrical wires inside the copper electrical plate. In this problem the stove panel appeared to be connected. But several wires were just riding the plate and each terminal screw had to be tightened.
      Panel wires were not connected
      Fig.4
      Step 5: Fig.5 If you can not find any problem the other choice is to stop and look at the wiring diagram. All electrical appliances have schematics (technical plans) and most of them are on the Internet. The diagram will show which wire color to put on each electrical connector. Reconnect the plug to the wall. Turn on the electrical circuit breaker. Next check the stove if you have power, then you know the job is done correctly. 

      Tip: Remember if you are unsure, call an Appliance Technician. 


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      Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

      How to Use Door Stop and What are They For

      This is the door spring back plate with a Phillip screw
      Fig.1 Back plate
      By Gary Boutin

      Supplies and Tools:
      Metal door kit
      Back plate
      Brass screw
      Door spring with rubber cap

      This post shows the four steps to install a simple spring door stop on a wall.

      Step 1: Fig.1 shows all the parts to a wall door spring.

      • The round piece is the back plate which has a hole at the bottom.
      • The brass screw holds the back plate to the wall, or baseboard.
      • The spring wire is the actual door spring with a rubber tip.

      Step 2: Fig.2 shows the back plate and the brass screw against the wall. Place the hole at the bottom of the back plate. The spring will need to go into the hole.
      Phillip screw hold the back plate on the wall
      Fig.2 Screw
      Step 3: Fig.3 shows the spring is being turned into the hole.
      Thread the spring into the door back plate
      Fig.3 Tuning
      Step 4: Fig.4 shows the spring completely against the wall ready for use.
      The door spring needs to be tight
      Fig.4 Spring
      Step 5: Door stops have been used since homes have needed doors for protection and privacy. This post provides information and pictures showing the different choices available to the homeowner.  


      Fig.5 shows a stubby spring doorstop.

      This spring is small for tight spaces
      Fig.5 Stubby
      Step 6: The main use of the door stop is to stop the door from damaging the walls. Fig.6 shows the door stop is mounted on the door and prevents the wall or cabinet from being damaged.  

      Sometimes its better to place the door spring on the door itself
      Fig.6 Door mounted
      Step 7: Door stops used for homes can be decorative and come in a variety of colors. Fig.7 shows this spring is colored aluminum perfect for the bath.
      Door springs come in all colors
      Fig.7 Bronze

      Step 8: Baseboard door stops are attached to the bottom edge of the baseboard by a metal base with a screw in the bottom of the base, the spring is screwed into the baseboard to give the spring a firm foundation.

      When there is no choice use the baseboard to install the door spring
      Fig.8 Baseboard stop
      Step 9: Floor door stops are attached to the floor and have a rubber base, usually used on heavier doors. Some of these are seen in business offices.
      Step 10: Fig.9 and fig.10 shows a wall-mounted door stops are installed on walls and stop the door at the door knob. Fig. 11 and fig.12 shows circular wall mounted shield to prevent the door handle from damaging the wall.
      Step 11: Hinge pin door stops stop the door out of the way on the hinge. The stop is usually mounted on the top hinge, and this combination stops the door from hitting the wall. The problem with this stop is it can pull the hinge out and damage the door.
      Business doors are heavier so use the Rubber shield
      Fig.9 Commercial
      This shield prevent damage to the wall and the door
      Fig.10 Wall mounted
      Door plate is used for door knob damage, this shield prevents this
      Fig.11 Package
      The wall shield comes in different sizes and colors
      Fig.12 Mounted shield


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      Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-

      How to Replace Bathroom Resin Cove Base Molding

      This is the best molding for wet areas like bathroom
      Fig.1 Resin molding
      By Gary Boutin 
       
      Supplies and Tools: 

      Brads 
      Delta compound saw 12-inch
      Dust mask 
      Latex caulking
      Measuring tape  
      Resin base molding
      Safety goggles
      White semi-gloss paint

      Willie is a postal employee that travels 360 days a year, and has little time to work on his century old studio cottage in downtown Chino, California. The problem Willie had was his bathroom floor had a large gap in the tile and the wall area. The area needed a cove base molding, a product that would not produce mold and could be used near a shower. Resin molding comes in white and looks like plastic in case it gets wet.

      This post shows the eight steps to replacing the resin cove base molding and caulking it to the wall and floor. 

      Step 1. The Home Depot molding had several choices, but the resin cove base molding stood out. The dimensions of the molding were two and half inches in height by eight feet in length. It was the perfect application because the molding would never produce mold, and it was priced right at eight dollars.
      Step 2. Fig.1 shows the resin molding and adhesive glue. 

      Step 3. Fig.2 shows the first piece of molding, the first cut is for the first corner and was cut at 45 degrees.


      Use a tape measure for the right fit
      Fig.2 Measuring
      Step 4. Fig.3 Delta® compound saw.
      This is a Delta Compound Saw used to cut molding
      Fig.3 Measure on saw

      Step 5. Fig.4 shows a top view of both corners, in preparation for caulking.

      This is the bathroom corner that needed to be replaced
      Fig.4 Nice clean corner
      Step 6. Fig.5 shows the Delta saw teeth on the resin molding. As a precaution the person using the saw should use adjust mask and safety goggles.

      Be careful to wear the proper gear before using this Delta saw
      Fig.5 Delta ® teeth
      Step 7. Fig.6 and fig.7 shows that latex caulking was used on wall and the edge of the molding and on the floor.
      Use caulking to prevent water moisture from getting into the home
      Fig.6 Caulk molding
      Use silicone caulking on the top and the bottom of the resin molding
      Fig.7 Caulk top
      Step 8. Fig.8 shows both sides of the corner molding. The job is finished. See the two different angles to get this job done. The new resin molding added to the floor and all the trim had been caulked for a clean new look. Now Willie can enjoy his bathroom without the worry of mold damaging the new trim.

      This moisture resistant bathroom corner is finished
      Fig.8 Job finished

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      Note: The DIY Advisor assumes no liability for omissions, errors or the outcome of any jobs. The reader must always exercise reasonable caution, follow current codes and regulations that may apply, and is urged to consult with a licensed contractor if in doubt about any steps on these posts. All names were changed to protect client's privacy. DIY Advisor. Reproduction of site content including photos without permission prohibited. All rights reserved. © Copyright 2011-